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Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

8 edition of Lincoln and Douglass found in the catalog.

Lincoln and Douglass

an American friendship

by Nikki Giovanni

  • 76 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by Henry Holt and Co. in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Lincoln, Abraham, -- 1809-1865 -- Juvenile literature,
  • Douglass, Frederick, -- 1818-1895 -- Juvenile literature,
  • Presidents -- United States -- Biography -- Juvenile literature,
  • African American abolitionists -- Biography -- Juvenile literature,
  • Friendship -- United States -- Juvenile literature

  • Edition Notes

    StatementNikki Giovanni ; illustrated by Bryan Collier.
    GenreJuvenile literature., Biography
    ContributionsCollier, Bryan, ill.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsE457.905 .G56 2008
    The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Pagination1v.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16471825M
    ISBN 100805082646
    ISBN 109780805082647
    LC Control Number2007050397

    "Much of my scholarship and books have focused on inter-racial friendships and alliances," Stauffer said. "I discovered when I was working on my first book that Douglass met with Lincoln three times at the White House and was the first black man to meet with a U.S. president. Much changed in the way Douglass regarded Lincoln with his announcement of the Emancipation Proclamation. After the Proclamation was made public, Lincoln's sense of the war was becoming more aligned with that of Douglass's. As the war's purpose expanded, Douglass and Lincoln began to share a sense of the significance of the war.

    A dramatic double-page spread of the Emancipation Proclamation fast-forwards to a March evening in at the White House, where President and Mrs. Lincoln are hosting an inaugural ball and to which Frederick Douglass is an invited guest. Giovanni then goes back in time to Douglass's and Lincoln's childhoods, comparing and contrasting. It's then back to the ball via .   Douglass presciently assessed the contours of the coming Civil War (during which he met Lincoln three times) and saw how the “inexorable logic of events” would propel most of his activist agenda. Though slow to emancipate, reluctant to employ black troops and unwilling to make any firm commitment to giving the black man voting rights.

      The name of the book is "Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln." And Author John Stauffer joins us now. He teaches history and English at Harvard University. Provides an account of the friendship between Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass in one of the most tumultuous periods in United States history through an examination of the ideals they shared and the work they did toward eliminating slavery. This book is about an unusual friendship between two great American leaders. The illustrator.


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Lincoln and Douglass by Nikki Giovanni Download PDF EPUB FB2

From the author of Lincoln: A Photobiography, comes a clear-sighted, carefully researched account of two surprisingly parallel lives and how they intersected at a critical moment in U.S.

history. Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass were both self-taught, both great readers and believers in the importance of literacy, both men born poor who by their own /5(45). Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass is an intriguing book written by Russell Freedman, that describes the bond between Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass.

Lincoln and Douglass book At the beginning, it starts with saying how both main characters grew up. Then, it talks about how both people interacted later in their lives, and at the end it says how Lincoln dies/5. This book is an excellent one.

Guelzo certainly knows his stuff. Rather than focusing the book primarily on Lincoln and Douglass book seven debates between Lincoln and Douglas, Guelzo expands the picture and examines in detail the entire political campaigns of in order to give the debates by:   The book said Mary Lincoln didn't want colored people to be free, even though she was sympathetic to the abolitionist cause.

It said that Lincoln & Douglass shared a love of good food, even though Lincoln ate very little (sometimes just an apple) and only feasted on simple Johnny Cakes.4/4(14). At the same time, Lincoln’s antislavery sentiments were lacking in the eyes of Douglass.

While he is known to many today as the “Great Emancipator,” Abraham Lincoln’s own views on slavery were more multifaceted and convoluted than that title might imply, evolving significantly during the four years of his presidency.

7 Upon his inauguration, his moral outrage. Historians have traditionally regarded the series of seven debates between Stephen A. Douglas and Abraham Lincoln during the Illinois state election campaign as among the most significant.

Red Book for Lincoln-Douglas Debate. by Chris Jeub | Mar 1, Perfect Paperback $ $ Get it as soon as Fri, Jul FREE Shipping by Amazon. Only 17 left in stock (more on the way). More Buying Choices $ (5 used & new offers) The Complete Lincoln-Douglas Debates of by Abraham.

Lincoln’s feet, Douglass wrote, were extended and the president was surrounded by stacks of documents and “busy” secretaries. AD Lincoln appeared tired, but rose and extended his hand. Welcome to the Official Site of Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child. Here you can learn more about the authors, their collaboration and their books.

Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln were the preeminent self-made men of their time. In this masterful dual biography, award-winning Harvard University scholar John Stauffer describes the transformations in the lives of these two giants during a major shift in cultural history, when men rejected the status quo and embraced new ideals of personal liberty/5(49).

Douglass protested, then sent word to the president that he was outside. Within minutes, he was admitted. “When Mr. Lincoln saw me, his countenance lighted up,” Douglass recalled, “and he said in a voice which was heard all around: ‘Here comes my friend Douglass.’” The president shook his friend’s hand.

This was a consistent theme in Douglass’s conversations with Abe Lincoln and in his writing about the Lincoln administration. Douglass always insisted upon African Americans being treated with dignity and equality (for example, he insisted that African-American soldiers fighting for the Union should receive the same pay that white ones did).

On the eve of this year's Presidential election, I decided to read this intriguing book about the friendship between Abraham Lincoln, our 16th President, and Frederick Douglass, an abolitionist who was a former slave in the South before escaping to freedom in the North.4/5.

The Lincoln-Douglas debates were a series of formal political debates between the challenger, Abraham Lincoln, and the incumbent, Stephen A. Douglas, in a campaign for one of Illinois' two United States Senate seats. Although Lincoln lost the election, these debates launched him into national prominence which eventually led to his election as.

The first conversation between Douglass and Lincoln on Augremains one of the pivotal moments in American history: when a former slave could enter the office of the president to discuss significant issues and festering problems and, more remarkable still, when the president could seem to enjoy Douglass’s opinions and views, no.

Black abolitionist leader and former slave Frederick Douglass believed that African Americans could achieve freedom and full citizenship only by participating in the war.

Because Lincoln’s first concern was preserving the Union, he did not publicly support the recruitment of black soldiers until after he issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1,   The place of Lincoln, and books about him, in a nation jaggedly divided again.

Lincoln’s life, Widmer says, “is a story of incredible survival against adversity. And more than survival, really. Divided into 10 chapters, the book offers biographical details for each man, an overview of the Civil War, Lincoln's changing attitude toward African Americans, Douglass's endeavors to create black regiments within the Union army, and descriptions of ISBN: This book tells some interesting stories about both Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass.

I don't know that it tied the two together often enough, or had a very powerful central thesis, but in regards to Douglass it was pretty good in discussing 4/5. Stauffer's parallel lives theme is a good one, but anyone who wants to read a book devoted to it should read James Oakes's The Radical and the Republican: Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics ().

Stauffer tells the essential Lincoln-Douglass stories but they die in the telling. Historians Harold Holzer, Edna Greene Medford and David Blight talked about the views of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass on emancipating those held in slavery.

They tracked their evolution. A review by Publishers Weekly praised the book for its detailed and keen analysis of its subjects and points out that because Douglass had the more modern political views, the book is “really a study through his eyes of the more complex figure of Lincoln As Douglass shifts from denouncing Lincoln’s foot-dragging to revering his.Freedman revisits the subject of his Newbery-winning Lincoln: A Photobiography (), but this time the 16th president shares billing with his friend and ally, abolitionist Frederick Douglass.